Our cardiology community is responding to the growing number of emerging adults with often complex congenital heart disease. Collaborations are springing up between adult and pediatric cardiologists, advanced practice nurses, patients, and families to address the health care, research, and advocacy needs for this population. Workforce and institutional needs are being defined and research collaborations are being formed. Meanwhile, health care reform is evolving through fits and starts with little predictability regarding its medium and long-term impact. Since ultimately finances trump philosophy, it is essential that we understand the financial underpinnings of healthcare delivery to patients with this unique model of chronic disease in order to carry out these plans.

What is unique about this population with chronic disease? The most obvious feature is that they have the potential of contributing to the GDP for 40+ years. Another is that for the more complex lesions, society has already invested a considerable amount to achieve survival into adult life. Finally, the period of early adulthood is relatively uneventful in terms of complications and resource utilization compared with early childhood and later adult life. Thus, the basic needs to maintain cardiovascular status and prevent secondary disability may be modest in comparison with treating some of the severe consequences of their disease, such as poorly managed valve regurgitation or arrhythmia that eventually requires costly solutions such as transplantation. It is important, therefore, to define the resource requirements and potential health outcomes of a healthcare system that would be designed for this population.

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Our cardiology community is responding to the growing number of emerging adults with often complex congenital heart disease. Collaborations are springing up between adult and pediatric cardiologists, advanced practice nurses, patients, and families to address the health care, research, and advocacy needs for this population. Workforce and institutional needs are being defined and research collaborations are being formed. Meanwhile, health care reform is evolving through fits and starts with little predictability regarding its medium and long-term impact. Since ultimately finances trump philosophy, it is essential that we understand the financial underpinnings of healthcare delivery to patients with this unique model of chronic disease in order to carry out these plans.

What is unique about this population with chronic disease? The most obvious feature is that they have the potential of contributing to the GDP for 40+ years. Another is that for the more complex lesions, society has already invested a considerable amount to achieve survival into adult life. Finally, the period of early adulthood is relatively uneventful in terms of complications and resource utilization compared with early childhood and later adult life. Thus, the basic needs to maintain cardiovascular status and prevent secondary disability may be modest in comparison with treating some of the severe consequences of their disease, such as poorly managed valve regurgitation or arrhythmia that eventually requires costly solutions such as transplantation. It is important, therefore, to define the resource requirements and potential health outcomes of a healthcare system that would be designed for this population.

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IN THIS ISSUE

Lipids and Lipoproteins

Vol 15, Issue 1 (2019)


FEATURED GUEST EDITOR

ISSUE INTRO

Lipids and Cardiovascular Disease: Putting it All Together

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RECOGNITIONS

Guest Editors Henry Pownall and Antonio Gotto Offer Insight and Expertise on the topic of Lipids and Cardiovascular Disease

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REVIEW ARTICLES See More

Cholesterol: Can’t Live With It, Can’t Live Without It

How Much Do Lipid Guidelines Help the Clinician? Reading Between the (Guide)lines

Statins: Then and Now

Poststatin Lipid Therapeutics: A Review

HDL and Reverse Cholesterol Transport Biomarkers

Revisiting Reverse Cholesterol Transport in the Context of High-Density Lipoprotein Free Cholesterol Bioavailability

High-Density Lipoprotein Subspecies in Health and Human Disease: Focus on Type 2 Diabetes

Gene Delivery in Lipid Research and Therapies

CASE REPORTS See More

Device-Related Thrombus: A Reason for Concern?

Retained Coronary Balloon Requiring Emergent Open Surgical Retrieval: An Uncommon Complication Requiring Individualized Management Strategies

Loperamide Mimicking Brugada Pattern

Reversed Pulsus Paradoxus in Right Ventricular Failure

MUSEUM OF HMH MULTIMODALITY IMAGING CENTER See More

Transcatheter Embolization of a Persistent Vertical Vein: A Rare Cause of Left-to-Right Shunt and Right-Sided Heart Failure

CLINICAL PERSPECTIVES See More

EXCERPTA

Talking Statins with Antonio Gotto

POINTS TO REMEMBER

Lipids and Renal Disease

EXCERPTA

Addressing the Feedback Loop Between Depression, Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Disease

POINTS TO REMEMBER

The Kidney as an Endocrine Organ

EDITORIALS

Addressing the Underrepresentation of Women in Cardiology through Tangible Opportunities for Mentorship and Leadership

Vol 15, Issue 1 (2019)

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