Methodist Journal

FEATURED GUEST EDITOR

ISSUE INTRO

The Burgeoning Field of Cardio-Oncology

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RECOGNITIONS

Barry H. Trachtenberg Leads Issue on Cardio-Oncology

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REVIEW ARTICLES See More

Heart Failure in Relation to Anthracyclines and Other Chemotherapies

Heart Failure in Relation to Tumor-Targeted Therapies and Immunotherapies

The Role of Cardiovascular Imaging and Serum Biomarkers in Identifying Cardiotoxicity Related to Cancer Therapeutics

Prevention and Treatment of Chemotherapy-Induced Cardiotoxicity

Cardiovascular Toxicities of Radiation Therapy

Electrophysiologic Complications in Cancer Patients

Vascular Toxicity in Patients with Cancer: Is There a Recipe to Clarify Treatment?

Future Directions in Cardio-Oncology

CASE REPORTS See More

A Rare Case of Pancreatitis-Induced Thrombosis of the Aorta and Superior Mesenteric Artery

Anomalous Origin of the Right Coronary Artery from the Left Main Coronary Artery in the Setting of Critical Bicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis

Simultaneous Transfemoral Mitral and Tricuspid Valve in Ring Implantation: First Case Report with Edwards Sapien 3 Valve

Uneventful Follow-Up 2 Years after Endovascular Treatment of a High Flow Iatrogenic Aortocaval Fistula Causing Pulmonary Hypertension and Right Heart Failure

MUSEUM OF HMH MULTIMODALITY IMAGING CENTER See More

Do Not Pass Flow: Microvascular Obstruction on Cardiac Magnetic Resonance After Reinfarction Following Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

CLINICAL PERSPECTIVES See More

EXCERPTA

Cardio-Oncology, Then and Now: An Interview with Barry Trachtenberg

POINTS TO REMEMBER

Onconephrology: An Evolving Field

POINTS TO REMEMBER

Herbal Nephropathy

EXCERPTA

Rolling the Dice on Red Yeast Rice

EDITORIALS

Letter to the Editor in Response to “Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy in Diabetes Mellitus”

Vol 11, Issue 3 (2015)

Humanities Full Text

POET'S PEN

Achilles Refuses to Atone for His Crimes

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Article Citation:

Michael Lieberman. Achilles Refuses to Atone for His Crimes. Methodist DeBakey Cardiovascular Journal. September 2015, Vol. 11, No. 3, pp. 198.

doi: https://doi.org/10.14797/mdcj-11-3-198

Remorse arrived like a summer of crows.
He shooed the birds as if they were the plague,
thought to recall the envoys, then banished them.
Athena, commissure of my journey, you,
I longed for when I took that woman, raped her.
I only sought your counsel, your consortium.
Athena, you ignored me, so I had her.
Fate dealt me her, her death, my swag, escape.
Return and educate me—lead me out
of impulse, as I writhe naked in the slough.
He closed his eyes and sought the woman he
had known since second grade and always loved—
the woman nested in him by his manhood,
that residue of fire trusted to him,
the boyish, gray-eyed goddess, virgin temptress
whose face and smile surged within him though
a thousand layers down. His psyche’s keep
impeded her, not willing to accede
to Cronus’ soul-submerging, evil sway,
as if to say, “Bend first to me, renounce
your unchecked rage and I will give you access
to the goddess. Now you cannot hear her.”
A riptide of desire had swept him out
to sea, but she remained hard-wired in him,
offline but ready in his circuitry.
I won’t atone, I won’t. I know it’s wrong,
but you deserted me. I’m lost and still
search every pretty face for you, Athena,
commissure and journey—limbic you,
nebulous anchor of clarity, deceit.
He thought, Look, give it up. The will-o’-the-wisp
is not worth chasing. There’s Briseis waiting.
Why dredge regret up from the swamp?

—Michael Lieberman, M.D.

 

In this excerpt from Michael Lieberman’s forthcoming book, The Houstiliad, An Iliad for Houston (Texas Review Press, fall 2015), we get a look at the rage of Achilles. Like Homer’s Iliad, The Houstiliad is driven by Achilles’ rage. Book I opens with Achilles, accompanied by his white macaw Patroclus, killing Mestor, Hector’s brother, and abducting, raping, and murdering Mestor’s wife. Towards the end of Book I it appears that Achilles has gotten away with his crimes. After several days he suffers momentary remorse but then tries to lay the blame on Athena, his inner guide and mentor.