Methodist Journal

IN THIS ISSUE

Lipids and Lipoproteins

Vol 15, Issue 1 (2019)


FEATURED GUEST EDITOR

ISSUE INTRO

Lipids and Cardiovascular Disease: Putting it All Together

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RECOGNITIONS

Guest Editors Henry Pownall and Antonio Gotto Offer Insight and Expertise on the topic of Lipids and Cardiovascular Disease

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REVIEW ARTICLES See More

Cholesterol: Can’t Live With It, Can’t Live Without It

How Much Do Lipid Guidelines Help the Clinician? Reading Between the (Guide)lines

Statins: Then and Now

Poststatin Lipid Therapeutics: A Review

HDL and Reverse Cholesterol Transport Biomarkers

Revisiting Reverse Cholesterol Transport in the Context of High-Density Lipoprotein Free Cholesterol Bioavailability

High-Density Lipoprotein Subspecies in Health and Human Disease: Focus on Type 2 Diabetes

Gene Delivery in Lipid Research and Therapies

CASE REPORTS See More

Device-Related Thrombus: A Reason for Concern?

Retained Coronary Balloon Requiring Emergent Open Surgical Retrieval: An Uncommon Complication Requiring Individualized Management Strategies

Loperamide Mimicking Brugada Pattern

Reversed Pulsus Paradoxus in Right Ventricular Failure

MUSEUM OF HMH MULTIMODALITY IMAGING CENTER See More

Transcatheter Embolization of a Persistent Vertical Vein: A Rare Cause of Left-to-Right Shunt and Right-Sided Heart Failure

CLINICAL PERSPECTIVES See More

EXCERPTA

Talking Statins with Antonio Gotto

POINTS TO REMEMBER

Lipids and Renal Disease

EXCERPTA

Addressing the Feedback Loop Between Depression, Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Disease

POINTS TO REMEMBER

The Kidney as an Endocrine Organ

EDITORIALS

Addressing the Underrepresentation of Women in Cardiology through Tangible Opportunities for Mentorship and Leadership

Vol 15, Issue 1 (2019)

Article Full Text

IN MEMORIAM

Manus James O'Donnell, M.D. 1929–2010

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Article Citation:

William L. Winters Jr. (2011) Manus James O’Donnell, M.D. 1929–2010. Methodist DeBakey Cardiovascular Journal: July 2011, Vol. 7, No. 3, pp. 56-56.



One of Dr. Michael E. DeBakey’s favorite cardiologists, Dr. Manus James O’Donnell, died March 22, 2010 at age 80. Manus, as he was known to his friends, remained an Irishman to the core during his years in Houston, retaining proudly his Irish brogue. Manus was born in Killough County, Ireland, on May 5, 1929. He attended St. Malachy’s College (class of 1945) in Belfast, Ireland, before entering medical school in Queens University, Belfast, graduating in 1955. He then served an internship at the Mater Infirmorum Hospital in Belfast, followed by a medical residency at the Royal Victoria Hospital completed in 1958. During Manus’s cardiology fellowship at the Royal Victoria Hospital, he engaged in animal experiments using the Lillehei Dewall pump oxygenator with Dr. Frank Partridge, who was preparing to start a human open-heart surgery program. From 1960 to 1965, he served as a principal registrar in medicine and collected numerous scholastic honors on his way to becoming a member of the Royal College of Physicians in 1961.

 

Manus James O’Donnell, M.D. 1929–2010

 

In 1965, he accepted a fellowship in cardiology at Baylor College of Medicine and moved his family to Houston, Texas, their permanent residence thereafter. Upon completing the one-year cardiology fellowship, he accepted an appointment as assistant professor in medicine at Baylor with an active staff appointment at The Methodist Hospital, where he remained until his retirement in 2003. His professional career centered around his teaching and clinical responsibilities at Baylor College of Medicine and The Methodist Hospital. Starting in 1975, he directed the activities of the cardiac catheterization laboratories at The Methodist Hospital for many years. He shared with several other cardiologists the responsibilities managing the patients of Dr. Michael E. DeBakey — an intellectual and physical challenge every day of the week. His good humor, ready smile, and Irish brogue endeared him to his colleagues and patients alike. His favorite relaxation was golf played all over the world, wherever there might be found a golf course.

He left behind his wife of 50 years, Patricia, and his daughter, Phiona, plus two sisters and several nieces and nephews. Manus was a delightful colleague and a compassionate physician embodied in a very fine human being. He is one of those upon whose shoulders was built the foundation of The Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center as it stands today. He is missed, but his spirit remains enshrined within the walls of this Center.

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