Methodist Journal

IN THIS ISSUE

Lipids and Lipoproteins

Vol 15, Issue 1 (2019)


FEATURED GUEST EDITOR

ISSUE INTRO

Lipids and Cardiovascular Disease: Putting it All Together

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RECOGNITIONS

Guest Editors Henry Pownall and Antonio Gotto Offer Insight and Expertise on the topic of Lipids and Cardiovascular Disease

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REVIEW ARTICLES See More

Cholesterol: Can’t Live With It, Can’t Live Without It

How Much Do Lipid Guidelines Help the Clinician? Reading Between the (Guide)lines

Statins: Then and Now

Poststatin Lipid Therapeutics: A Review

HDL and Reverse Cholesterol Transport Biomarkers

Revisiting Reverse Cholesterol Transport in the Context of High-Density Lipoprotein Free Cholesterol Bioavailability

High-Density Lipoprotein Subspecies in Health and Human Disease: Focus on Type 2 Diabetes

Gene Delivery in Lipid Research and Therapies

CASE REPORTS See More

Device-Related Thrombus: A Reason for Concern?

Retained Coronary Balloon Requiring Emergent Open Surgical Retrieval: An Uncommon Complication Requiring Individualized Management Strategies

Loperamide Mimicking Brugada Pattern

Reversed Pulsus Paradoxus in Right Ventricular Failure

MUSEUM OF HMH MULTIMODALITY IMAGING CENTER See More

Transcatheter Embolization of a Persistent Vertical Vein: A Rare Cause of Left-to-Right Shunt and Right-Sided Heart Failure

CLINICAL PERSPECTIVES See More

EXCERPTA

Talking Statins with Antonio Gotto

POINTS TO REMEMBER

Lipids and Renal Disease

EXCERPTA

Addressing the Feedback Loop Between Depression, Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Disease

POINTS TO REMEMBER

The Kidney as an Endocrine Organ

EDITORIALS

Addressing the Underrepresentation of Women in Cardiology through Tangible Opportunities for Mentorship and Leadership

Vol 15, Issue 1 (2019)

Article Full Text

IN MEMORIAM

Michael Thomas McDonough, M.D. 1928 – 2010

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Article Citation:

William L. Winters Jr. (2011) Michael Thomas Mcdonough, M.D. 1928 – 2010. Methodist DeBakey Cardiovascular Journal: January 2011, Vol. 7, No. 1, pp. 66.

doi: https://doi.org/10.14797/mdcj-7-1-66

In everyone’s life, there emerge a few who make a lasting impression. In my life, one such person was Michael T. McDonough, M.D., who died in Philadelphia on March 27, 2010, at age 82. A native of Brooklyn, New York, Michael was educated at Fordham University and received his medical degree at Georgetown School of Medicine, where he came under the influence of Dr. Proctor Harvey. He did a one-year internship in Buffalo, New York, and returned to Washington, DC, for his medical residency, which he completed in 1958.

Our close connection began in 1960, when he entered the cardiology fellowship program at Temple University Hospital (TUH) in Philadelphia after serving two years as a captain in the United States Army. I was a young cardiologist on the faculty at that time, having just finished my own cardiology fellowship two years prior. For the next eight years, we worked side by side — his first year as a fellow and the next seven as partners and close friends in the cardiology section at TUH under the leadership of Dr. Louis A. Soloff.

 

Michael Thomas McDonough, M.D.
1928 – 2010

Dr. McDonough’s positive attributes were numerous, but I especially enjoyed his warm personality and infectious sense of humor. I watched him mature into a compassionate physician and intuitive teacher. His ability to find the right answers and communicate with patients was his forte. For a large man, he was among the gentlest, and his focus never varied from providing superb care for his patients and teaching doctors the importance of honesty, integrity, and compassion — the hallmarks of trust.

Teaching by word and example, his professional demeanor was impeccable. After I left Temple University Hospital in 1968, our communication became less frequent but his exploits were never far from mind through updates from colleagues, especially Dr. Fred Bove, former chairman of the cardiology section at TUH and the immediate past President of the American College of Cardiology. His contributions to the clinical lore of THU’s cardiology section were pervasive for over 35 years

Michael and his wife, Mary, always wanted a large family. They were successful in rearing eight children, with all but one still living in Philadelphia today. His religion kept him very active in his church, and his love for children kept him busy coaching young sportsmen. By choice, he was a homebody living for his family and for his profession. His youngest child summed it up best in a note to me: “I think he practiced medicine as he parented: with compassion, love and patience. He was the best man I have ever known.” What warmer eulogy can there be? Many of our readers won’t recognize his name, except those in the Philadelphia area. But there are many physicians like Michael McDonough. You just have to look far for them. And when you find them, nourish and treasure them, because they represent what is best in practicing the art and science of medicine.

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