Methodist Journal

IN THIS ISSUE

Adult Congenital Heart Update

Vol 15, Issue 2 (2019)


FEATURED GUEST EDITOR

ISSUE INTRO

The Growing Number of Adults Surviving with Congenital Heart Disease

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RECOGNITIONS

Drs. MacGillivray and Lin Take the Lead in Adult Congenital Heart Disease

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REVIEW ARTICLES See More

Advanced Cardiac Imaging for Complex Adult Congenital Heart Diseases

149 Fontan Conversions

Anomalous Aortic Origin of a Coronary Artery

Pulmonary Valve Replacement for Tetralogy of Fallot

Management of the Adult with Arterial Switch

Ebstein’s Anomaly

Heart Transplantation in Adults with Congenital Heart Disease

Cholesterol: Can’t Live With It, Can’t Live Without It

CASE REPORTS See More

Simultaneous Transfemoral Mitral and Tricuspid Valve in Ring Implantation: First Case Report with Edwards Sapien 3 Valve

Uneventful Follow-Up 2 Years after Endovascular Treatment of a High Flow Iatrogenic Aortocaval Fistula Causing Pulmonary Hypertension and Right Heart Failure

Device-Related Thrombus: A Reason for Concern?

Retained Coronary Balloon Requiring Emergent Open Surgical Retrieval: An Uncommon Complication Requiring Individualized Management Strategies

MUSEUM OF HMH MULTIMODALITY IMAGING CENTER See More

Do I Look Fat in This? Multimodality Imaging Findings of a Cardiac Lipoma

CLINICAL PERSPECTIVES See More

POINTS TO REMEMBER

The Kidney in Congenital Cyanotic Heart Disease

EXCERPTA

Talking Statins with Antonio Gotto

POINTS TO REMEMBER

Lipids and Renal Disease

EXCERPTA

Addressing the Feedback Loop Between Depression, Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Disease

EDITORIALS

Letter to the Editor in Response to “Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy in Diabetes Mellitus”

Vol 8, Issue 3 (2012)

Article Full Text

EDITORIALS

Amyloid Heart Disease : The Deathly Protein Invasion – A Personal Pers Pective

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Article Citation:

Arvind Bhimaraj (2012) Amyloid Heart Disease : The Deathly Protein Invasion – A Personal Pers Pective. Methodist DeBakey Cardiovascular Journal: July 2012, Vol. 8, No. 3, pp. 19-20.

doi: https://doi.org/10.14797/mdcj-8-3-19

Abstract

The gusts of cold wind were harsh as I treaded the wild terrain of despair. As a physician, I carried the torch of hope, a bestowment that conferred immense responsibility. I felt the burden of divine expectation, from the wounded to deftly navigate this unchartered terrain and offer a respite from suffering. Upon entering the battle-zone, I could not fail to notice the despondency in their eyes — and with it a glimmer of hope from the reflection of my torch. As I approached the edge of a steep cliff, I saw him: a meek, astonished, and badly wounded man holding on to his dear life with his last vestige of strength. His desperate, helpless family stood by, with their hands tied and their voices loud with cries for help. A sense of relief dawned on them when they heard my footsteps in the distance. As I stumbled through the terrain, I tried to estimate how long his weak hands could hold on to the edge, and how fast I needed to leap and grab-on and initiate my fight with the demons of death. The fog muddled my vision; the cries of suffering numbed my senses. The terrain lay divided — this one man dangling on the edge, and the rest on the other side. I reached out to save him, but the winds of suffering were too strong for this wounded soldier. Helplessly, I watched him plummet into the abyss of darkness. There were marks of other would-be messiahs by the edge, signs of other unsuccessful attempts to save him. Consternation consumed me: I held a baton in my hand that I could not deliver, sorrow in my heart, and a sense of hopelessness and doubt looming inside me. The burden of the torch grew heavier, making me wonder if I was ever suitable to carry it.

Keywords
amyloid heart disease , heart failure , amyloidosis

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