We performed a literature review of 16 previously reported cases. Histologically, a cardiac CAT consists of calcification and eosinophilic amorphous material in the background of dense collagenous fibrous tissue. A review of these cases shows a wide range of age at diagnosis and slight female predominance. The patients are either asymptomatic at presentation or complain of shortness of breath. The tumors have been found in all chambers of the heart, most commonly in the left ventricle. The sizes of the tumors range from 0.17 to 4 cm, with 62.5% of the tumors being mobile. Among the nine cases with documented follow-up study, all but one was free of disease and only one case of relapse was recorded. In conclusion, cardiac CATs are frequently asymptomatic at presentation, size is equal to or less than 4 cm, they can be located in all four chambers and are usually mobile, and they may relapse when not completely excised.

" /> We performed a literature review of 16 previously reported cases. Histologically, a cardiac CAT consists of calcification and eosinophilic amorphous material in the background of dense collagenous fibrous tissue. A review of these cases shows a wide range of age at diagnosis and slight female predominance. The patients are either asymptomatic at presentation or complain of shortness of breath. The tumors have been found in all chambers of the heart, most commonly in the left ventricle. The sizes of the tumors range from 0.17 to 4 cm, with 62.5% of the tumors being mobile. Among the nine cases with documented follow-up study, all but one was free of disease and only one case of relapse was recorded. In conclusion, cardiac CATs are frequently asymptomatic at presentation, size is equal to or less than 4 cm, they can be located in all four chambers and are usually mobile, and they may relapse when not completely excised.

"> Article Full Text – Methodist Journal
Methodist Journal

IN THIS ISSUE

Lipids and Lipoproteins

Vol 15, Issue 1 (2019)


FEATURED GUEST EDITOR

ISSUE INTRO

Lipids and Cardiovascular Disease: Putting it All Together

See More
RECOGNITIONS

Guest Editors Henry Pownall and Antonio Gotto Offer Insight and Expertise on the topic of Lipids and Cardiovascular Disease

See More

REVIEW ARTICLES See More

Cholesterol: Can’t Live With It, Can’t Live Without It

How Much Do Lipid Guidelines Help the Clinician? Reading Between the (Guide)lines

Statins: Then and Now

Poststatin Lipid Therapeutics: A Review

HDL and Reverse Cholesterol Transport Biomarkers

Revisiting Reverse Cholesterol Transport in the Context of High-Density Lipoprotein Free Cholesterol Bioavailability

High-Density Lipoprotein Subspecies in Health and Human Disease: Focus on Type 2 Diabetes

Gene Delivery in Lipid Research and Therapies

CASE REPORTS See More

Device-Related Thrombus: A Reason for Concern?

Retained Coronary Balloon Requiring Emergent Open Surgical Retrieval: An Uncommon Complication Requiring Individualized Management Strategies

Loperamide Mimicking Brugada Pattern

Reversed Pulsus Paradoxus in Right Ventricular Failure

MUSEUM OF HMH MULTIMODALITY IMAGING CENTER See More

Transcatheter Embolization of a Persistent Vertical Vein: A Rare Cause of Left-to-Right Shunt and Right-Sided Heart Failure

CLINICAL PERSPECTIVES See More

EXCERPTA

Talking Statins with Antonio Gotto

POINTS TO REMEMBER

Lipids and Renal Disease

EXCERPTA

Addressing the Feedback Loop Between Depression, Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Disease

POINTS TO REMEMBER

The Kidney as an Endocrine Organ

EDITORIALS

Addressing the Underrepresentation of Women in Cardiology through Tangible Opportunities for Mentorship and Leadership

Vol 10, Issue 1 (2014)

Article Full Text

CASE REPORTS

Calcified Amorphous Tumor of the Heart: Case Report and Review of the Literature

Jump to:
Article Citation:

Eunice K. Choi, Jae Y. Ro, and Alberto G. Ayala. Calcified Amorphous Tumor of the Heart: Case Report and Review of the Literature. Methodist DeBakey Cardiovascular Journal: January 2014, Vol. 10, No. 1, pp. 38-40.

doi: https://doi.org/10.14797/mdcj-10-1-38

Abstract

Calcified amorphous tumor of the heart (cardiac CAT) is a rare non-neoplastic cardiac mass that mimics malignancy on imaging and can cause symptoms due to flow obstruction or embolization of calcific fragments. We report a 57-year-old female with multiple medical problems affected by cardiac CAT. The echocardiogram showed a 2 × 1.7 cm right atrial mass. Under the clinical diagnosis of cardiac myxoma, a mass resection was performed. Microscopic examination of the resected mass showed nodular calcified amorphous debris with admixed degenerated fibrin and focal chronic inflammation. At the 1-year follow-up, the patient was free of disease.

We performed a literature review of 16 previously reported cases. Histologically, a cardiac CAT consists of calcification and eosinophilic amorphous material in the background of dense collagenous fibrous tissue. A review of these cases shows a wide range of age at diagnosis and slight female predominance. The patients are either asymptomatic at presentation or complain of shortness of breath. The tumors have been found in all chambers of the heart, most commonly in the left ventricle. The sizes of the tumors range from 0.17 to 4 cm, with 62.5% of the tumors being mobile. Among the nine cases with documented follow-up study, all but one was free of disease and only one case of relapse was recorded. In conclusion, cardiac CATs are frequently asymptomatic at presentation, size is equal to or less than 4 cm, they can be located in all four chambers and are usually mobile, and they may relapse when not completely excised.

Keywords
calcified tumor , cardiac tumor , non-neoplastic

Add Comments

Please login to dialogue with author.

Comments