Use of invasive devices such as central lines, urinary catheters, ventilators, etc. — all of which are commonly utilized in the care of cardiac surgical patients — is one of the most significant risk factors for acquiring HAIs. Cardiac patients also have significant co-morbidities such as diabetes, obesity, increasing frailty, advanced age, and multiple redo-operations. This combination makes our patients more vulnerable to HAIs. Accordingly, in 2010 the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists (SCA) Foundation launched the FOCUS (Flawless Operative Cardiovascular Unified Systems) Cardiac Surgery Patient Safety Initiative to help eliminate infections in cardiac surgery patients, especially catheter-related infections.6 This publication will briefly discuss the four most common infections and strategies to reduce HAIs and will touch on some of the infection-control experiences from the Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center (MDHVC).

" /> Use of invasive devices such as central lines, urinary catheters, ventilators, etc. — all of which are commonly utilized in the care of cardiac surgical patients — is one of the most significant risk factors for acquiring HAIs. Cardiac patients also have significant co-morbidities such as diabetes, obesity, increasing frailty, advanced age, and multiple redo-operations. This combination makes our patients more vulnerable to HAIs. Accordingly, in 2010 the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists (SCA) Foundation launched the FOCUS (Flawless Operative Cardiovascular Unified Systems) Cardiac Surgery Patient Safety Initiative to help eliminate infections in cardiac surgery patients, especially catheter-related infections.6 This publication will briefly discuss the four most common infections and strategies to reduce HAIs and will touch on some of the infection-control experiences from the Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center (MDHVC).

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IN THIS ISSUE

Nutritional Supplements and the Heart

Vol 15, Issue 3 (2019)


FEATURED GUEST EDITOR

ISSUE INTRO

Dietary Supplements: Facts and Fallacies

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RECOGNITIONS

Drs. Raizner and Cooke Take the Lead in Special Issue on Supplements

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REVIEW ARTICLES See More

Recent Clinical Trials Shed New Light on the Cardiovascular Benefits of Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Supplemental Vitamins and Minerals for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and Treatment

Coenzyme Q10

Red Yeast Rice for Hypercholesterolemia

Inorganic Nitrate Supplementation for Cardiovascular Health

Vitamin D and Calcium Supplements: Helpful, Harmful, or Neutral for Cardiovascular Risk?

Cardiovascular Risk of Proton Pump Inhibitors

Advanced Cardiac Imaging for Complex Adult Congenital Heart Diseases

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A Rare Case of Pancreatitis-Induced Thrombosis of the Aorta and Superior Mesenteric Artery

Anomalous Origin of the Right Coronary Artery from the Left Main Coronary Artery in the Setting of Critical Bicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis

Simultaneous Transfemoral Mitral and Tricuspid Valve in Ring Implantation: First Case Report with Edwards Sapien 3 Valve

Uneventful Follow-Up 2 Years after Endovascular Treatment of a High Flow Iatrogenic Aortocaval Fistula Causing Pulmonary Hypertension and Right Heart Failure

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Snoopy’s Heart: A Case of Complete Congenital Absence of the Pericardium

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POINTS TO REMEMBER

Herbal Nephropathy

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Rolling the Dice on Red Yeast Rice

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The Kidney in Congenital Cyanotic Heart Disease

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Talking Statins with Antonio Gotto

EDITORIALS

Letter to the Editor in Response to “Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy in Diabetes Mellitus”

Vol 7, Issue 2 (2011)

Article Full Text

REVIEW ARTICLES

Preventing Healthcare-Associated Infections In Cardiac Surgical Patients As A Hallmark Of Excellence

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Article Citation:

Faisal Masud and Daynene Vykoukal (2011) Preventing Healthcare-Associated Infections In Cardiac Surgical Patients As A Hallmark Of Excellence. Methodist DeBakey Cardiovascular Journal: April 2011, Vol. 7, No. 2, pp. 48-50.

doi: https://doi.org/10.14797/mdcj-7-2-48

Abstract

Healthcare-associated infections (HAI) are the tenth-leading cause of death in the United States.1 The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that HAIs annually account for 1.7 million infections, 99,000 associated deaths, and a cost of approximately $30 billion.2, 3 Nonreimbursement of some of these HAIs by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, public reporting of data (currently in 27 states), and the statistics listed above are driving quality initiatives to reduce or eliminate HAIs. However, a 2009 report from the Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality showed that little progress has been made towards eliminating HAIs.2 Reducing the risk of healthcare-associated infections is the Joint Commission’s National Patient Safety Goal Number 7.4

Cardiac surgery has always been at the leading edge of innovation and quality care. Improvements in this field have been brought about by the needs of critically ill patients who are at high risk of death and by leaders such as Dr. Michael DeBakey who were driven to provide excellence in patient care. One of the prime examples of quality initiatives in cardiac surgery has been the development of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) National Database. This has helped to develop benchmarks by which different institutions are measured. The STS database will lead another initiative by providing public presentation of hospital- and surgeon-specific data in the near future.5 Even so, cardiac surgery patients are at especially high risk of developing HAIs.

Use of invasive devices such as central lines, urinary catheters, ventilators, etc. — all of which are commonly utilized in the care of cardiac surgical patients — is one of the most significant risk factors for acquiring HAIs. Cardiac patients also have significant co-morbidities such as diabetes, obesity, increasing frailty, advanced age, and multiple redo-operations. This combination makes our patients more vulnerable to HAIs. Accordingly, in 2010 the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists (SCA) Foundation launched the FOCUS (Flawless Operative Cardiovascular Unified Systems) Cardiac Surgery Patient Safety Initiative to help eliminate infections in cardiac surgery patients, especially catheter-related infections.6 This publication will briefly discuss the four most common infections and strategies to reduce HAIs and will touch on some of the infection-control experiences from the Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center (MDHVC).

Keywords
healthcare-associated infections , HAI , risk management , risk factors , infection control

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