Methodist Journal

FEATURED GUEST EDITOR

ISSUE INTRO

The Scourge of Cardiogenic Shock

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RECOGNITIONS

Arvind Bhimaraj, MD, MPH, Guides Issue on Cardiogenic Shock

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REVIEW ARTICLES See More

Pathophysiology and Advanced Hemodynamic Assessment of Cardiogenic Shock

Cardiogenic Shock in the Setting of Acute Myocardial Infarction

Cardiogenic Shock in Patients with Advanced Chronic Heart Failure

Acute Mechanical Circulatory Support for Cardiogenic Shock

Management of Cardiogenic Shock in a Cardiac Intensive Care Unit

Physiological Concepts of Cardiogenic Shock Using Pressure-Volume Loop Simulations: A Case-Based Review

Systems of Care in Cardiogenic Shock

Cardiogenic Shock in Perioperative and Intraoperative Settings: A Team Approach

CASE REPORTS See More

Repair of Extent III Thoracoabdominal Aneurysm in the Presence of Aortoiliac Occlusion

Williams-Beuren Syndrome: The Role of Cardiac CT in Diagnosis

A Rare Case of Pancreatitis-Induced Thrombosis of the Aorta and Superior Mesenteric Artery

Anomalous Origin of the Right Coronary Artery from the Left Main Coronary Artery in the Setting of Critical Bicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis

MUSEUM OF HMH MULTIMODALITY IMAGING CENTER See More

A T2-Weighty Discovery: Aortitis on Cardiac MRI with Histopathologic Correlation

CLINICAL PERSPECTIVES See More

POINTS TO REMEMBER

Acute Kidney Injury in Cardiogenic Shock

EXCERPTA

Cardio-Oncology, Then and Now: An Interview with Barry Trachtenberg

POINTS TO REMEMBER

Onconephrology: An Evolving Field

POINTS TO REMEMBER

Herbal Nephropathy

EDITORIALS

Letter to the Editor in Response to “Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy in Diabetes Mellitus”

Vol 14, Issue 4 (2019)

Article Full Text

MUSEUM OF HMH MULTIMODALITY IMAGING CENTER

A Right Ventricular Mass

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Article Citation:

Marin-Acevedo JA, Chirila RM. A Right Ventricular Mass. Methodist DeBakey Cardiovasc J. 2018;14(4):303.



Keywords
right ventricular mass , cardiac tumor , cardiac metastasis , transthoracic echocardiogram ,  cardiac magnetic resonance , cardiac imaging , TTE , CMR

A 60-year-old male presented with a 2-day history of progressive dyspnea. Three months prior to presentation, he was diagnosed with a left calf undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma. He had known pulmonary and bony metastases and was receiving systemic chemotherapy with doxorubicin. Physical examination revealed tachypnea, tachycardia, and a left calf mass. A computed tomography (CT) of the chest revealed new bilateral small pulmonary emboli (yellow arrow) and a right ventricular (RV) mass (Figure 1, red arrow). A transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) showed a large solid mass (arrow) that obliterated the RV apex (Figure 2). Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) confirmed the presence of a gadolinium-enhancing mass consistent with metastasis (Figure 3, arrows). The patient was started on anticoagulation for pulmonary embolism and on a new line of chemotherapy with gemcitabine and docetaxel.

Whereas primary cardiac tumors are rare and mostly benign, metastatic cardiac involvement is silent and occurs in up to 9% of patients with known malignancies. Cardiac tumors have been reported in up to 25% of autopsies of patients with soft-tissue sarcomas. In practice, cardiac metastatic involvement is incidentally found by staging imaging. Diagnostic evaluation involves different modalities: TTE is useful for initial evaluation, and transesophageal echocardiogram allows a more comprehensive evaluation; CT offers anatomic details of the mass and detects extracardiac involvement; and CMR identifies the precise location and pericardial invasion. Managing these lesions often requires palliative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Surgery is usually reserved for life-threatening complications. Unfortunately, prognosis is poor despite treatment, and overall survival ranges from 6 to 12 months.

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