Our cardiology community is responding to the growing number of emerging adults with often complex congenital heart disease. Collaborations are springing up between adult and pediatric cardiologists, advanced practice nurses, patients, and families to address the health care, research, and advocacy needs for this population. Workforce and institutional needs are being defined and research collaborations are being formed. Meanwhile, health care reform is evolving through fits and starts with little predictability regarding its medium and long-term impact. Since ultimately finances trump philosophy, it is essential that we understand the financial underpinnings of healthcare delivery to patients with this unique model of chronic disease in order to carry out these plans.

What is unique about this population with chronic disease? The most obvious feature is that they have the potential of contributing to the GDP for 40+ years. Another is that for the more complex lesions, society has already invested a considerable amount to achieve survival into adult life. Finally, the period of early adulthood is relatively uneventful in terms of complications and resource utilization compared with early childhood and later adult life. Thus, the basic needs to maintain cardiovascular status and prevent secondary disability may be modest in comparison with treating some of the severe consequences of their disease, such as poorly managed valve regurgitation or arrhythmia that eventually requires costly solutions such as transplantation. It is important, therefore, to define the resource requirements and potential health outcomes of a healthcare system that would be designed for this population.

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Our cardiology community is responding to the growing number of emerging adults with often complex congenital heart disease. Collaborations are springing up between adult and pediatric cardiologists, advanced practice nurses, patients, and families to address the health care, research, and advocacy needs for this population. Workforce and institutional needs are being defined and research collaborations are being formed. Meanwhile, health care reform is evolving through fits and starts with little predictability regarding its medium and long-term impact. Since ultimately finances trump philosophy, it is essential that we understand the financial underpinnings of healthcare delivery to patients with this unique model of chronic disease in order to carry out these plans.

What is unique about this population with chronic disease? The most obvious feature is that they have the potential of contributing to the GDP for 40+ years. Another is that for the more complex lesions, society has already invested a considerable amount to achieve survival into adult life. Finally, the period of early adulthood is relatively uneventful in terms of complications and resource utilization compared with early childhood and later adult life. Thus, the basic needs to maintain cardiovascular status and prevent secondary disability may be modest in comparison with treating some of the severe consequences of their disease, such as poorly managed valve regurgitation or arrhythmia that eventually requires costly solutions such as transplantation. It is important, therefore, to define the resource requirements and potential health outcomes of a healthcare system that would be designed for this population.

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Methodist Journal

FEATURED GUEST EDITOR

ISSUE INTRO

The Scourge of Cardiogenic Shock

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RECOGNITIONS

Arvind Bhimaraj, MD, MPH, Guides Issue on Cardiogenic Shock

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REVIEW ARTICLES See More

Cardiovascular Implications of COVID-19 Infections

Pathophysiology and Advanced Hemodynamic Assessment of Cardiogenic Shock

Cardiogenic Shock in the Setting of Acute Myocardial Infarction

Cardiogenic Shock in Patients with Advanced Chronic Heart Failure

Acute Mechanical Circulatory Support for Cardiogenic Shock

Management of Cardiogenic Shock in a Cardiac Intensive Care Unit

Physiological Concepts of Cardiogenic Shock Using Pressure-Volume Loop Simulations: A Case-Based Review

Systems of Care in Cardiogenic Shock

CASE REPORTS See More

COVID-19: A Potential Risk Factor for Acute Pulmonary Embolism

Repair of Extent III Thoracoabdominal Aneurysm in the Presence of Aortoiliac Occlusion

Williams-Beuren Syndrome: The Role of Cardiac CT in Diagnosis

A Rare Case of Pancreatitis-Induced Thrombosis of the Aorta and Superior Mesenteric Artery

MUSEUM OF HMH MULTIMODALITY IMAGING CENTER See More

A T2-Weighty Discovery: Aortitis on Cardiac MRI with Histopathologic Correlation

CLINICAL PERSPECTIVES See More

POINTS TO REMEMBER

Acute Kidney Injury in Cardiogenic Shock

EXCERPTA

Cardio-Oncology, Then and Now: An Interview with Barry Trachtenberg

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Onconephrology: An Evolving Field

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Herbal Nephropathy

EDITORIALS

Letter to the Editor in Response to “Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy in Diabetes Mellitus”

Vol 7, Issue 2 (2011)

Article Abstract

Caring For ACHD In A Market-Driven Society


Article Citation:

Roberta G. Williams and Yang Lu (2011) Caring For ACHD In A Market-Driven Society. Methodist DeBakey Cardiovascular Journal: April 2011, Vol. 7, No. 2, pp. 33-34.

doi: https://doi.org/10.14797/mdcj-7-2-33

Abstract
Our cardiology community is responding to the growing number of emerging adults with often complex congenital heart disease. Collaborations are springing up between adult and pediatric cardiologists, advanced practice nurses, patients, and families to address the health care, research, and advocacy needs for this population. Workforce and institutional needs are being defined and research collaborations are being formed. Meanwhile, health care reform is evolving through fits and starts with little predictability regarding its medium and long-term impact. Since ultimately finances trump philosophy, it is essential that we understand the financial underpinnings of healthcare delivery to patients with this unique model of chronic disease in order to carry out these plans.

What is unique about this population with chronic disease? The most obvious feature is that they have the potential of contributing to the GDP for 40+ years. Another is that for the more complex lesions, society has already invested a considerable amount to achieve survival into adult life. Finally, the period of early adulthood is relatively uneventful in terms of complications and resource utilization compared with early childhood and later adult life. Thus, the basic needs to maintain cardiovascular status and prevent secondary disability may be modest in comparison with treating some of the severe consequences of their disease, such as poorly managed valve regurgitation or arrhythmia that eventually requires costly solutions such as transplantation. It is important, therefore, to define the resource requirements and potential health outcomes of a healthcare system that would be designed for this population.

Keywords
adult congenital heart disease , multidisciplinary , healthcare reform , health care , economics , finances