This issue affects all of us, including the non-obese. Obesity increases health insurance premiums for the average non-obese worker by an average of $150 a year in 1998 dollars,9 totaling $25.6 billion in extra premium costs.

" /> This issue affects all of us, including the non-obese. Obesity increases health insurance premiums for the average non-obese worker by an average of $150 a year in 1998 dollars,9 totaling $25.6 billion in extra premium costs.

"> Article Abstract – Methodist Journal
Methodist Journal

IN THIS ISSUE

Nutritional Supplements and the Heart

Vol 15, Issue 3 (2019)


FEATURED GUEST EDITOR

ISSUE INTRO

Dietary Supplements: Facts and Fallacies

See More
RECOGNITIONS

Drs. Raizner and Cooke Take the Lead in Special Issue on Supplements

See More

REVIEW ARTICLES See More

Recent Clinical Trials Shed New Light on the Cardiovascular Benefits of Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Supplemental Vitamins and Minerals for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and Treatment

Coenzyme Q10

Red Yeast Rice for Hypercholesterolemia

Inorganic Nitrate Supplementation for Cardiovascular Health

Vitamin D and Calcium Supplements: Helpful, Harmful, or Neutral for Cardiovascular Risk?

Cardiovascular Risk of Proton Pump Inhibitors

Advanced Cardiac Imaging for Complex Adult Congenital Heart Diseases

CASE REPORTS See More

A Rare Case of Pancreatitis-Induced Thrombosis of the Aorta and Superior Mesenteric Artery

Anomalous Origin of the Right Coronary Artery from the Left Main Coronary Artery in the Setting of Critical Bicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis

Simultaneous Transfemoral Mitral and Tricuspid Valve in Ring Implantation: First Case Report with Edwards Sapien 3 Valve

Uneventful Follow-Up 2 Years after Endovascular Treatment of a High Flow Iatrogenic Aortocaval Fistula Causing Pulmonary Hypertension and Right Heart Failure

MUSEUM OF HMH MULTIMODALITY IMAGING CENTER See More

Snoopy’s Heart: A Case of Complete Congenital Absence of the Pericardium

CLINICAL PERSPECTIVES See More

POINTS TO REMEMBER

Herbal Nephropathy

EXCERPTA

Rolling the Dice on Red Yeast Rice

POINTS TO REMEMBER

The Kidney in Congenital Cyanotic Heart Disease

EXCERPTA

Talking Statins with Antonio Gotto

EDITORIALS

Letter to the Editor in Response to “Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy in Diabetes Mellitus”

Vol 5, Issue 4 (2009)

Article Abstract

Reducing Obesity: Policy Strategies From The Tobacco Wars


Article Citation:

Carolyn L. Engelhard, Arthur Garson, Jr., and Stan Dorn (2009) Reducing Obesity: Policy Strategies From The Tobacco Wars. Methodist DeBakey Cardiovascular Journal: October 2009, Vol. 5, No. 4, pp. 46-50.

doi: https://doi.org/10.14797/mdcj-5-4-46

Abstract

Obesity Sickens, Kills, and Creates Significant Societal Costs

For the first time since the Civil War, American life expectancy is projected to decrease.1 The reason: diseases related to obesity.

Obesity now affects one in six children and more than one in three adults.2, 3 Obesity rates have more than doubled over the past 40 years, and the percentage of children age six to 11 who are obese has quadrupled,4 climbing from 4 to 18.8%; 40% of American adults will be obese by 2015.5 Obesity and excess weight contribute to more than 20 chronic illnesses, ranging from diabetes and hypertension to conditions with less well-known links to obesity, such as colon cancer.6 In 2000, obesity caused an estimated 112,000 deaths.7 With each obese employee estimated to cost employers 20 lost days of work a year, obesity adversely affects productivity more than any other health problem.

Rising obesity rates also affect health care spending.8 In 2009, obesity and overweight together will add $228 billion to the nation’s health care bills.

This issue affects all of us, including the non-obese. Obesity increases health insurance premiums for the average non-obese worker by an average of $150 a year in 1998 dollars,9 totaling $25.6 billion in extra premium costs.

Keywords
obesity , overweight , lifestyle , healthcare , economics , diabetes