Methodist Journal

IN THIS ISSUE

Nutritional Supplements and the Heart

Vol 15, Issue 3 (2019)


FEATURED GUEST EDITOR

ISSUE INTRO

Dietary Supplements: Facts and Fallacies

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RECOGNITIONS

Drs. Raizner and Cooke Take the Lead in Special Issue on Supplements

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REVIEW ARTICLES See More

Recent Clinical Trials Shed New Light on the Cardiovascular Benefits of Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Supplemental Vitamins and Minerals for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and Treatment

Coenzyme Q10

Red Yeast Rice for Hypercholesterolemia

Inorganic Nitrate Supplementation for Cardiovascular Health

Vitamin D and Calcium Supplements: Helpful, Harmful, or Neutral for Cardiovascular Risk?

Cardiovascular Risk of Proton Pump Inhibitors

Advanced Cardiac Imaging for Complex Adult Congenital Heart Diseases

CASE REPORTS See More

A Rare Case of Pancreatitis-Induced Thrombosis of the Aorta and Superior Mesenteric Artery

Anomalous Origin of the Right Coronary Artery from the Left Main Coronary Artery in the Setting of Critical Bicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis

Simultaneous Transfemoral Mitral and Tricuspid Valve in Ring Implantation: First Case Report with Edwards Sapien 3 Valve

Uneventful Follow-Up 2 Years after Endovascular Treatment of a High Flow Iatrogenic Aortocaval Fistula Causing Pulmonary Hypertension and Right Heart Failure

MUSEUM OF HMH MULTIMODALITY IMAGING CENTER See More

Snoopy’s Heart: A Case of Complete Congenital Absence of the Pericardium

CLINICAL PERSPECTIVES See More

POINTS TO REMEMBER

Herbal Nephropathy

EXCERPTA

Rolling the Dice on Red Yeast Rice

POINTS TO REMEMBER

The Kidney in Congenital Cyanotic Heart Disease

EXCERPTA

Talking Statins with Antonio Gotto

EDITORIALS

Letter to the Editor in Response to “Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy in Diabetes Mellitus”

Vol 15, Issue 1 (2019)

Article Abstract

Revisiting Reverse Cholesterol Transport in the Context of High-Density Lipoprotein Free Cholesterol Bioavailability


Article Citation:

Rosales C, Gillard BK, Xu B, Gotto AM Jr, Pownall HJ. Revisiting Reverse Cholesterol Transport in the Context of High-Density Lipoprotein Free Cholesterol Bioavailability. Methodist DeBakey Cardiovasc J. 2019:15(1):47-54.

doi:

Abstract

Dysregulated free cholesterol (FC) metabolism has been implicated in nearly all stages of atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of most cardiovascular disease. According to a widely cited model, the burden of macrophage FC in the arterial wall is relieved by transhepatic reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), which comprises three successive steps: (1) macrophage FC efflux to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and/or its major protein, apolipoprotein AI; (2) FC esterification by lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT); and (3) HDL-cholesteryl ester (CE) uptake via the hepatic HDL-receptor, scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1). Recent studies have challenged the validity of this model, most notably the role of LCAT, which appears to be of minor importance. In mice, most macrophage-derived FC is rapidly cleared from plasma (t1/2 < 5 min) without esterification by hepatic uptake; the remainder is taken up by multiple tissue and cell types, especially erythrocytes. Further, some FC is cleared by the nonhepatic transintestinal pathway. Lastly, FC movement among lipid surfaces is reversible, so that a higher-than-normal level of HDL-FC bioavailability—defined by high plasma HDL levels concurrent with a high mol% HDL-FC—leads to the transfer of excess FC to cells in vivo. SR-B1-/- mice provide an animal model to study the mechanistic consequences of high HDL-FC bioavailability that provokes atherosclerosis and other metabolic abnormalities. Future efforts should aim to reduce HDL-FC bioavailability, thereby reducing FC accretion by tissues and the attendant atherosclerosis.

Keywords
free cholesterol bioavailability , reverse cholesterol transport , cholesterol , high density lipoproteins , atherogenesis , lipid metabolism